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Lensois

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  1. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from timesle in Pierre-Michel Lasogga   
    Re: Pierre-Michel Lasogga
    Lasogga finished the season with 13 goals in hand. Quite impressive as he wasn't thoughted to be playing the first-line in the attack. Though with Rob Friend's failure to score, Lasogga gained some more and more opportunities from coach Babbel and he ultimately finished on the 7th place in the Zweite Bundesliga top scorer table. Lasogga, not too long ago, was also awarded with a contract extension. He signed on and his new contract will run until 2015, so he is definately a keeper in other words. I'm sure that Babbel, who gave the young Lasogga so much confidence when Hertha had so much pressure and expectations to return back to the top flight (Hertha are traditionally quite the big club), won't suddenly start to not fancy young Pierre-Michel.
  2. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Caleb in Official French Ligue 1 & 2 Thread   
    Re: French Ligue 1 and 2
  3. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Kroitzz in Members who you get on the best with...!   
    Re: Members who you get on the best with...!
    Kroitzz
    Tiësto
    Fercasti
    Villa
    Toonfanforlife
    Guanaco
    Daragh
    May have forgotten someone - pardon me.
  4. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Phil (GT) in Official French Ligue 1 & 2 Thread   
    Re: French Ligue 1 and 2
    All of them are good talents, but if you could get better players in a swap deal (which is quite common in GC's), all of them, except for Tabanou and Sertic, I'd let go of in case you could get someone better. So, I'd only stick with Tabanou and Sertic in the long run and the rest are players I'd try to swap for other players.
    Also, just seen that Bernard Mendy, the former fullback of PSG, has moved to Denmark! Quite suprising obviously, as he used to be a great player for PSG (and even an French international in the early 00's). I really don't know what has made his promising career gone so downhill - he was good in Paris - if I remember right, he didn't get a new contract as the parts couldn't reach an agreement over a new contract. Of course he had his up's and down's at Hull, but he couldn't have been so bad that he was left un-attached and ultimately signing for a Danish team (Odense). Hopefully, he'll ''take a step into the right direction for his career'', as he stated...
  5. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from dhulldevsfan in Simone Calvano - Milan's new Pirlo?   
    Re: Simone Calvano - Milan's new Pirlo?
    Thanks.
    I also added a video of Calvano.
  6. Downvote
    Lensois got a reaction from Kapitan Kloss in Raphael Martinho   
    Raphael Martinho

    Age: 23
    Nationallity: Brazilian
    Position: Midfielder
    Club: Catania
    His Career:




    Raphael's certainly not been following the usually pattern of Brazil (and generally world-wide) - Rapahel took the big step from the Serie D club Paulista to play for the second biggest outfit of the Sicilian island, Catania Calcio. After snubbing Brazilian giants such as Internacional and Santos, Martinho came to Europe as the first signing for Catania in the summer of '10. However, we can tape his career a bit and start of at 2007: Martinho started his career within the youth ranks of Brazilian club Paulista. In 2007 he got sold to the Monte Alegre outfit, Votoraty. However, he was sent back on loan to Paulista. In June 2009, about a year before the move to Italy, Raphael Martinho returned to Paulista.
    There's the background of this Brazilian fella'.
    On the 14th May 2010, Lo Monaco, the sports-director of Catania who is know for making prestigious spendings from South America for a low cost (Vargas and Jorge Martinez, for instance), suprised the Italian footballing fans with the signing of Martinho. Not only beacuse of the fact that he took the direct jump from Serie D back in his native Brazil, but he was an unknown player for the Calcio fans - not to mention the average fan of Brazil.
    Martinho has been used every know and then this season at Catania. Both Giampaolo and Simeone, who took charge of Catania after Giampaolo got fired, Martinho has been given some chances every now and then. Most notably comes Martinho performance against Palermo in the Sicilian derby to my mind. Martinho played on the left-midfield position in a 4-4-2 formation and had the assignment of taking Cassani out of the game and support Biagianti in his battle against Migliaccio on the central-midfield. Luckily for Martinho, he managed to do good work of his assignment. Unluckily for Martinho and Catania, Palermo also have two individuals called ''Pastore'' and ''Ilicic''.






    Playing-Style:




    Raphael can handle both the wingback (to the left), the defensive-midfield position and the left-midfield role as well. So we are talking about a very versailte player here. His characteristics is the work-rate and the clever function of both knowing when to attack and when to control himself and stay calm in the defence. He definately needs to work with the consistency, as he could be phenomenal for about 3-4 games and then be awful the next 3-4 games. However, he is still ''raw'', so I guess he'll mature with the age (and assuming he'll get regularly playing-time).
  7. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Kroitzz in Official : This or That?   
    Re: Official : This or That?
    Techno.
    Milan or Inter?
  8. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Guanaco in Simone Calvano - Milan's new Pirlo?   
    Name: Simone Calvano
    Nationality: Italian
    Age: 17
    Club: AC Milan
    Position: Midfielder
    So, Calvano started his career by playing for Atalanta. Atalanta is regarded also as having building up the best youth players in Italy. Calvano impressed on many with his box-to-box play, his good shot and his vision. He was a part of the Italian U-17 team that participated in the U-17 youth championship in Nigeria. He was even selected as one of the seven with most potential of the '93 group by the Italian media. Calvano caught the eye of many big teams around Italy and eventually joined Milan in January '10.
    He joined Milan alongside two other players in January - Benedict Didic and Houwei Ka Bamba. Calvano had to wait for a while with his debut for Milan though, but finally he made his debut in the Viareggio Tournament for about 2 months ago. He didn't get so many minutes there, but still impressed while he was getting the minutes.
    He is currently the youngest player in the Primavera Team (3 years younger than everybody else) and is slowly getting more and more playing time. He is currently fighting for a starting place with Strasser, who is one of the more ''experienced'' in this team and is also getting call-ups to the A-team.
    Calvano is an good old box-to-box player. Could easily do a good job as an defensive midfielder and as an offensive one. Has a great first touch, good vision, good shot. Reminds me of both Pirlo and De Rossi.
    Calvano has the potential, no doubt. He will have to have patience though. First of all, he needs to secure his starting spot in the Primavera team and I believe it will take a while do to that and namely when Strasser gets promoted to the first team, which should be soon. I really thinks he is better than Strasser, who is just very powerful, while Calvano is a box-to-box player. Calvano has the time to develop on his side though. Seeing as he is 3 years younger than everybody else in the team. I personally think he will get a starting spot in Milan's Primavera team next season. I wouldn't bet my money though that he will be an A-team player whitin 3 years beacuse he is still very young and developing. Have patience with him and I'm sure he'll turn out great.




  9. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Maxpayne in Official Serie A Thread   
    The Official Serie A Thread 2010/11
    I rate Nagatomo and I believe that he is a quality defender' date=' just like you. However, I'd say it's weird to see that Inter haven't been giving him more minutes ever since his break-through in the 08/09. I know that he's been quite injury-phrone after that season, but not always. To be honest, I'd take Santon over Chivu anyday of the week.
    Anyway, back to the reason why I jumped to this thread. Roma looks set to be bought by the American/Italian buissnessman, Thomas DiBenedetto. He's plans for Roma looks great, as he is mainly focusing on building a new stadium, bring in some more moneys to the squad in order to secure more quality players and his ambitions are beeing inspired by Barcelona.
    I have to mention that he is seeming as a guy you could believe in. He is associated with the NESV, who recently bought Liverpool and who promised investments into the squad, which they did when Carroll and Suarez joined the reds. The thing is though ~ even though he is associated with the NESV, they have no part in this planned buy-out and DiBenedetto is on his own (along with fellow partners) in this campaign. It seems that he is also ready to but AS Roma for € 150 million, which has been accepted by Unicredit and Italpetroli.
    The two things I'm most happy to see is if he will build a new stadium for Roma. I mean, it's nothing wrong with the Stadium Olimpico other than the facts that it is co-hosted with their fierest rival, Lazio, and that it is owned by the state of Rome. Therefore, it's not owned by the respective Rome teams - and that is a big, fat con. Generally, the stadiums in Italy aren't owned by the team(s) that is/are playing their trade. The San Siro is not owned by neither Inter nor Milan, La Favorita is not owned by Palermo and the Marassi is not owned by neither Genoa or Sampdoria. If you own a stadium, then you can expect the following things;
    [list']Your economy is getting at a better rate, as you do not co-own the incomes with another stadium - which Roma does now with Lazio. That's what the English team does - they own their stadiums and are getting a better incomes. If only teams such as Palermo or Lazio would get a taste of the income United are getting throughout every match-day at home, then they'd be over the moon. I'm willing to go as far and say that as much as United gets as an income for a 5 match-days period at home, is as much Palermo and Lazio gets throughout a whole season thanks to ticket-sales and such. Maybe I'm exaggerating a bit, but that's the truth.


    You do not have to pay that big sum of rent to the state. I mean, the teams are obviously hiring the right to the play at a specfic location, as the stadiums are generally owned by the Italian state. A large amout of the small income from your ticket-sales and such blows away to the state, as you have to pay them for the rights to play there.

    The third is perhaps more for the eye-opener - we'd get rid of those ugly, un-modern and largely over-sized stadiums. Teams such as Bari and Napoli have awfully big stadiums, that's a fact. They were modernized for the World Cup in Italy 21 years ago, but ever since then, most of the stadiums for that World Cup haven't been renovated or anything close to that. When team such as Roma and Lazio plays a mid-week game at a stadium with the capacity of 80.000 and you only see a figure of around 18-20.000 Romanistas/Laziales turning up, then you could see how much of a damage their naiveness for not making a financial contribution to place up a new stadium. The Stadio Olimpico is only full at two games throughout one season - when the Rome derby is played.

    Tessera del tifoso is clearly not working. Get that away! It's clearly not working ~ kids and innocent adults are getting banned from the stadiums, while the hooligans have a free-entry when the originial thing about this was to get away the hooligans from the stadiums and make the stadium more fondly to the rest of the crowd. A big and epic fail.
    The 2nd thing; DiBenedetto wants Sabatini as a sports-manager for Roma. Sabatini is one of the best scouts in the whole wide world, in my opinion. If it weren't for him, we wouldn't see Palermo tracking down and successfully sign quality talents one by one. He definately put an influence on the current Palermo squad with the signings of Abel Hernandez, Pastore, Muñoz, Bacinovic, Ilicic, João Pedro and Kasami. If he were to join Roma, DiBenendetto wouldn't need to shove in so much moneys on transfering, as Sabatini could do a succesful job with a similar transfer-budget to what Palermo are spending - and that is very tight.
    The vision for the futuristic Roma looks interesting to say the least...
  10. Like
    Lensois reacted to garymack in Graphics Design Feedback   
    Re: Graphics Design Feedback
    the look great m8' date=' V1 is the best IMO
    which ava do you think is best
    v1
    [img']http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af122/garymack83/Sigs%20and%20Large%20Art/luiz.png[/img]
    v2

    there is a slight difference by the way
  11. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Jack-THFC in Official AC Milan Thread   
    Re: Official AC Milan Thread
  12. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Gizb in Official Spanish La Liga Discussion Thread   
    Re: Official Spanish La Liga Discussion Thread
    I hope Sevilla plays him in the middle - either as an more attacking midfielder or as an more box-to-box-player - he will fail big if he stays on a flank. He is to slow for that and the big hype around him is wastly build on the flank that if he is used right, he can produce some good football. However, Sevilla aren't exactly in the best spirit at the moment, which Schalke hasn't either been this season, so I do not expect Rakitic to shine that much, to be honest. I mean, last season, when Schalke could roll in the points, he played in a central-role on the midfield (box-to-box-player), but this season, playing on the exact same position, he's been underperforming. The only difference between this years Schalke and the Schalke from the 09/10 season, is the fact that Schalke are in a horrible form right now and that they last season were serious contenders for the Bundesliga title.
    So, what I'm trying to say, is that if his team-mates aren't performing, he won't do it as well ~ he isn't that big of a talent people are trying make it sound like and I doubt he will be that much of a lift for you guys, to be honest. I may sound biased, but I'm truly not. Even Magath, the Schalke manager, had the intension of awarding Rakitic with a new contract as soon as the season started, but as Raktic couldn't follow up last season performances, Magath didn't want to renew his contract and instead slussed up Draxler, an youth-product of Schalke, during December and has since December and Draxler's income been giving Rakitic limited playing-time. All this despite the knowledge that Rakitic is still a product many teams want in their respective setup and the fact that he was sitting on a contract that was due to expire in the upcoming summer (which is why he came so cheaply to Spain and Sevilla).
    All in all, I'm not trying to say Rakitic will fail, but he won't shine as much as expected. He is kind of like Pirlo (not as good though, of course) - slow, doesn't show up themselves so much in the games and you could either love them or hate them - well, I hate those kind of players. They are overrated in my opinion ~ who can't hit a nice pass?
  13. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from puru in [Daniel Celso] Jara Martínez - Great Talent, Great Story   
    Jara Martínez

    Age: 17
    Nationallity: Paraguayan
    Position: Striker
    Club: Palermo
    His Career:




    Wondering about his name? Well, his official name is Jara Martínez, but he has two additional names as well (which is Daniel and Celso obviously) and he is using the name Daniel on the shirt.
    So let's roll on the story;
    The Palermoritarian audience are finding it hard to ge charmed about the youngsters from every corner of the world that are popping up in Sicily. Rino Foschi rolled on the story by snatching the biggest outfits in Europe on Edinson Cavani. He followed that up by bringing in the now Wolfsburg-departed defender, Simon Kjaer. Foschi would leave shortly afterwards and in came Walter Sabatini. After some months of scouting, Abel Hernandez and Pastore checked-in at Palermo. This was just the start of the carousel and in 2010, players such as Ezequiel Muñoz, Armin Bacinovic, Josip Ilicic, João Pedro and Pajtim Kasami checked-in.
    Jara Martínez caught the eye of Palermo about a year ago in the Torneo di Viareggio. It was the agent Gabriele Giufrrida who recomended Walter Sabatini to take a further look at Martínez. The winter-mercato had already been closed by then and most of the teams directors would just relax 'till the summer, but that isn't the style of Palermo (Sabatini). Sabatini sent one of the most skillful scouts of Palermo, Luca Cattani, to the tournament to follow
    Jara Martínez's progression in the game between Club Nacional (his club) and Gremio. It took Cattani approximately around 20 minutes to get convinced and he took the decision of bordering him on a plane to Italy.
    The directors at Palermo actually took Martínez to Palermo in a strange outfit (fake-moustache, hat and sun-glasses) in order to secure his services for Palermo, beacuse, as I said, the transfer-window wasn't open and as Martínez was followed by teams such as Inter, Lazio and Everton, Palermo didn't want the media to know that Martínez was training with Palermo. Palermo were afraid that these teams would offer him a better contract and he'd diss Palermo. He was often training with A-squad of Palermo, but always behind ''closed doors''. He was often impressive on the trainings and the media started to write about ''a certain Mr X is training with Palermo''. In the end, Palermo gave the media a name - ''Gonzalez, a 16-year old striker from Paraguay - nothing more. Several newspapers around at Sicily took a further look on this ''Gonzalez'' and they gave him the name Pablo Gonzalez.
    For about a half a year, everyone though Pablo Gonzalez were on a test at Palermo, but on Palermo's official website, on the last day of the summer-mercato '10, you could read that ''Daniel Celso Jara Martínez has now signed a 3-year contract with Palermo. Later, Sabatini would admit that Jara Martínez is this ''Gonzalez''.
    This season, Jara Martínez has been sitting on the Serie A-bench at occasions for Palermo and he got his debut against Parma, yesterday, when he came into the game in the 71th minute. However, Paletta and co. easily took advantage of their physics towards Martínez and he found it hard as the ''tip'' in a 3-men attack to pose as much to the Parma defence as a player such as Miccoli can do. However, he and the Palermo fans will for sure remember his debut further down the line, as Jara Martínez decided how they game would end.
    After 120 minutes, the game was still a draw and the game would be decided through penalties. Valiani, who took the 5th penalty for Parma, missed his penalty and it now stood 4-4. If Palermo would score this fourthcoming penalty, they'd advance to the semifinals. Jara Martínez didn't show any signs of mental weakness and comfortably stepped down to the penalty-spot, he converted his penalty and Palermo advanced in the Coppa Italia.
    That's how a star is born.


    Playing-Style:




    Very speedy player.


    Confident with the ball.


    Deadly infront of the goal.


    Reminds me of the Brazilian Ronaldo.



    IlayxxMF6J4
  14. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Hayden19 in Official French Ligue 1 & 2 Thread   
    Re: French Ligue 1 and 2
  15. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from andyowls in Bundesliga Winter Transfers 2011   
    Re: Bundesliga Winter Transfers 2011
  16. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from joepi in Official French Ligue 1 & 2 Thread   
    Re: French Ligue 1 and 2
  17. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from najduch5 in Official French Ligue 1 & 2 Thread   
    Re: French Ligue 1 and 2
    Good player, who has intergrated nicely into the Lorient setup. It is really the right team for him also, in my opinion. He definately has a bright future, for sure. I really think Kitambala could go really far in his career. If you have him in his squad, the keep him. If you don't, well buy him then!
    Anyway, Tigana seems to be heading out from Bordeaux and Ellie Baup and Rolland Courbis are beeing discussed as the most possible candidates to become the new manager of Les Girondins. If I recall, Courbis was put into jail back in '09 for beeing a part of that match-fixing scandal in the early 90's with Marseille. Of course, he's been successfull as manager, beacuse otherwise he wouldn't have been brought up as a candidate, but I'd still do not want him there. In my opinion, I think Gourcuff, the older one of course, would be the ideal manager for Bordeaux.
    He's been doing nice work with Lorient, helping them establish themselves in Ligue 1 with a limited budget. He is playing a good attacking football as well. He'd definately be well needed at Bordeaux, in my opinion. He is already beeing used to work with a limited budget, which he has done successfully at Lorient by bringing in players such as Gameiro, Bourillon, Diarra, Mvuemba, Kitambala and Abriel for very resonable prizes. I really think he'd still do a terrific work at Bordeaux if he'd be given a limited budget for transfering as he has clearly showed that at Lorient. Christian Gourcuff has established a side who has problems with managing their own grass (and since this season, they've been using artificial grass) every winter, which only shows their economic tightness and how successfull Gourcuff has been with working around it.
    The fact that he preferring to play an attacking football would also go home with the fans of Bordeaux and it would also be more logic to see Bordeaux playing an attacking football rather than an defensive one, as they are a top club, indeed. He definately is capable of doing the same wonders at Bordeaux, in my opnion. Of course, he has to work in a calm environment, every manager needs to do that, and there's only one problem - Bordeaux needs to buy him out from his contract with Lorient if they want to get his signature. That shouldn't be as much of a problem, seeing as these latest reports indicates that the owners of Bordeaux apparently aren't ready to pump in those €15 million anymore as they wanted to do when Gameiro was on the track. A manager doesn't cost that much - Mourinho was released from his contract with Inter for about €2 million - Gourcuff is nowhere as successful as him, so he be much cheaper. If Bordeaux and Triaud are smart, then, assuming Tigana goes, why not go for (Christian) Gourcuff...?
  18. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from AdaM EFC in Serie A Ratings 2010/2011   
    Re: Riferimento: Serie A Ratings 2010/2011
    You're the one to judge - you didn't even know which Serie A side you talked about in your previous post (Fiorentina)...
  19. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Jordan Tze in Official French Ligue 1 & 2 Thread   
    Re: French Ligue 1 and 2
    Well, Perrin is a quality player, but he will find it hard to have a break-through in the national team, as their are so many players in his position who also wants a shout in the team (Chantôme, Cabaye and Cheyrou, for instance). I like him, though, and I think he is a terrific (and an under-rated player). He's been of the better Les Verts player this season and he definately is capable of taking the step to a bigger club, no doubt.
    Just saw Zayatte moving Konyaspor - placed 16th in the Turkish league. They seem to have some high ambitions, as they've made 10 signings only this winter-mercato! Anyway, he moved to the Turkish outfit on the free. Once again, monsieur Martel, why couldn't you bring him in? I really rate Zayatte, and he has actually been at Lens in the past, but that was during his early years of a footballer. The wage demands couldn't have been a problem, seeing as he must have gone down a lot in wages for taking one the challenge of keep up Konyaspor in the Super Lig. Just getting so irritated on our mercato. We sell Boukari for a resoable price, but we do not the cash on players, even if their demands don't seem to be that high!
  20. Like
    Lensois reacted to Fercasti in Simple Avatar Tutorial   
    Hi, I will teach you how to make an avatar like this one:
    Effects:
    -Selective Color
    -Photo Filter
    -Brightness/Contrast
    -Textures

    1. Choose your stock and resize it holding shift. Place it how you think looks better.

    2. Add a Selective Color (Layer - New Adjustment Layer - Selective Color) and play with it.

    3. Add Texture 1 and Texture 2. Place them where you think looks better.

    4. Now Texture 3 and put it in a corner

    5. Now add a Photo Filter (Layer - New Adjustment Layer - Photo Filter)

    6. New Layer - Image - Apply Image and Desaturate it.
    Now change it to Soft Light and set opacity to 55%

    7. Now just give it some contrast: (Layer - New Adjustment Layer - Brightness/Contrast)



    Texture 1 (Color Dodge - Fill 66%): http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t274/FERCASTI7/8.png
    Texture 2 (Color Dodge): http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t274/FERCASTI7/9.jpg
    Texture 3 (Screen): http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t274/FERCASTI7/36ca5f11f764f2cd77ea05693f48980f.jpg
  21. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Matty_avfc in Official French Ligue 1 & 2 Thread   
    Re: French Ligue 1 and 2
  22. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Fercasti in Death of the un-sung hero (?)   
    The Defensive-Midfielder

    What defines a defensive-midfielder?


    Introduction
    Well, I dedicate this thread to the fact that the modern football (on the pitch) has taken the shape of becoming a game where the pace is now faster than ever, which means that you need creative players who can find a way of lock up the other teams defence in no time. This of course leads to certain player characters beeing ''overfloded'' and perhaps in some cases, not even needed. It reminds me of the game in it's early days when left-footed, good defensive-wise players, had to plays as a right-back and vice-versa for the right-footed defender. The pace of the early days football was of course not even close to the pace we are currently seeing, but as the game has always went on to gain more and more pace, the coaches could not even have patience with the fact that the left/right-footed defender had to turn the ball over to it's ''best foot'' (which only is a difference of micro-secounds!). Luckily, the coaches started to ''correct'' the problem by taking the easy decision of playing left-footed defenders on the left and right-footed defenders on the right.
    Let Me Explain Myself
    Many say the market-prices of many players are sky high at the moment, but so is the pace of the football as well. These recent years, I've noticed that defensive-midfielders are becoming fewer and fewer of their own kind, so-to-say. The amount of deep-lying play-makers have only been growing and growing these recent years. Even SM suggests that my theory is quite right - Out 58 defensive-midfielders that are rated 90 or above in the game, 35 players are I'd count players who are confident with the ball and could very easily bring in some creativity to his team. That's on the verge of becoming 2/3 of the todays elite of defensive-midfielder.


    Mourinho wants Schweinsteiger at Madrid as well...


    Once again: The fact that you need creativity to split apart a good defence and the fact that the pace of the football has developed very much only these recent years, means that you need creativity to lock up a defence. Pure defensive-midfielder (like Mascherano or Lass doesn't have it) and maybe that is why coaches such as Mourinho and Guardiola chooses to give creative defensive-midfielders such as Khedira and the perhaps more questionable decision, Busquets, the start ahead of them? Those seconds in terms of passing-skill between the mastermind defensive-midfielder and the old school defensive-midfielder could be the seconds that are seprating teams apart.
    Xavi, a mastermind player, is now rumored to be the one (out of the trio) who will recieve the FIFA World Player of The Year Award. Many around this globe wanted him to win it last year as well and hailed him as a more worthy winner than Leo Messi, the (usual) fan favourite. Could this only be a coincidence...?
    Examples
    Another example is the flow Germany had in their game during the World Cup. Pretty much the Bundesliga itself, Germany produced an attacking football and with 4 players upfront (3 attacking-midfielder and 1 lonely striker), their pressure was mounting high up on the pitch. Not even the 3 men midfield of Serbia could hold up against 2 techincally skilled passing-players (and not to mention, creative ones) in Schewinsteiger and Khedira. Germany just pressured them down and split the three-men defensive-midfield apart with some fast combinations. The battle against Spain showed that the team with the best creativity in their squad would win, as Spain didn't use any old school defensive-midfielder. Ultimately, individual skills would seal through a winner. Spain has the best players in their setup - that's a fact, and despite playing bad for most games in the World Cup, Spain won the World Cup thanks to individual performances. Did Germany use any old school midfielder in the World Cup? No. Did they succed? Yes. Did Spain use any old school midfielder in the World Cup? No. Did they succed? Yes. The same can be said about Inter - played smart (- used a rather stricted play, though), but once the ball reached the defensive-midfield consisting of Cambiasso-Zanetti-Motta, Sneijder-Milito-Eto'o (the three attackers) had the ball within seconds right at their feets. Inter won the CL thanks to the creativity from the midfielders espcially, as they could counter any team within seconds. Just look at their goals from the quarter-finals and up - they came through counter-attacks that were finished within seconds.


    Old school defensive-midfielders...


    How Do We Solve It? Can We Solve It?
    I do not know how the future will hold for these old school defensive-midfielders, but with the fact that the pace of the game is developing very quickly in such a short periods, the old school midfielders might be gone or in a very limited majority in about 15-20 years. I made a research on the SM database of players under the age of 21 and within the ratings of 85-90 (the next generation defensive-midfielders) and out of 28 players, I could only list 11 players as pure old school midfielders (with the majority of them beeing listed as CB's, that is). This situation isn't as easy to solve as the situation with the defenders that played on the (wrong) flanks in the early days of the football history, as this situation is a more complicated one. Perhaps move up certain central-defenders type such as speedy (Ivan Cordoba comes to my mind) or strong ones that could be a threat to it's own team if he is near the penalty-area, as he perhaps isn't the most tactically skilled one. The latter would fit a player like Chivu perfectly, who has actually been tried out their at occasions in Serie A.
    Maybe you all disagree with me, though. I am just looking for a discussion, so discuss!
  23. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Vermillian Sparrow in Death of the un-sung hero (?)   
    The Defensive-Midfielder

    What defines a defensive-midfielder?


    Introduction
    Well, I dedicate this thread to the fact that the modern football (on the pitch) has taken the shape of becoming a game where the pace is now faster than ever, which means that you need creative players who can find a way of lock up the other teams defence in no time. This of course leads to certain player characters beeing ''overfloded'' and perhaps in some cases, not even needed. It reminds me of the game in it's early days when left-footed, good defensive-wise players, had to plays as a right-back and vice-versa for the right-footed defender. The pace of the early days football was of course not even close to the pace we are currently seeing, but as the game has always went on to gain more and more pace, the coaches could not even have patience with the fact that the left/right-footed defender had to turn the ball over to it's ''best foot'' (which only is a difference of micro-secounds!). Luckily, the coaches started to ''correct'' the problem by taking the easy decision of playing left-footed defenders on the left and right-footed defenders on the right.
    Let Me Explain Myself
    Many say the market-prices of many players are sky high at the moment, but so is the pace of the football as well. These recent years, I've noticed that defensive-midfielders are becoming fewer and fewer of their own kind, so-to-say. The amount of deep-lying play-makers have only been growing and growing these recent years. Even SM suggests that my theory is quite right - Out 58 defensive-midfielders that are rated 90 or above in the game, 35 players are I'd count players who are confident with the ball and could very easily bring in some creativity to his team. That's on the verge of becoming 2/3 of the todays elite of defensive-midfielder.


    Mourinho wants Schweinsteiger at Madrid as well...


    Once again: The fact that you need creativity to split apart a good defence and the fact that the pace of the football has developed very much only these recent years, means that you need creativity to lock up a defence. Pure defensive-midfielder (like Mascherano or Lass doesn't have it) and maybe that is why coaches such as Mourinho and Guardiola chooses to give creative defensive-midfielders such as Khedira and the perhaps more questionable decision, Busquets, the start ahead of them? Those seconds in terms of passing-skill between the mastermind defensive-midfielder and the old school defensive-midfielder could be the seconds that are seprating teams apart.
    Xavi, a mastermind player, is now rumored to be the one (out of the trio) who will recieve the FIFA World Player of The Year Award. Many around this globe wanted him to win it last year as well and hailed him as a more worthy winner than Leo Messi, the (usual) fan favourite. Could this only be a coincidence...?
    Examples
    Another example is the flow Germany had in their game during the World Cup. Pretty much the Bundesliga itself, Germany produced an attacking football and with 4 players upfront (3 attacking-midfielder and 1 lonely striker), their pressure was mounting high up on the pitch. Not even the 3 men midfield of Serbia could hold up against 2 techincally skilled passing-players (and not to mention, creative ones) in Schewinsteiger and Khedira. Germany just pressured them down and split the three-men defensive-midfield apart with some fast combinations. The battle against Spain showed that the team with the best creativity in their squad would win, as Spain didn't use any old school defensive-midfielder. Ultimately, individual skills would seal through a winner. Spain has the best players in their setup - that's a fact, and despite playing bad for most games in the World Cup, Spain won the World Cup thanks to individual performances. Did Germany use any old school midfielder in the World Cup? No. Did they succed? Yes. Did Spain use any old school midfielder in the World Cup? No. Did they succed? Yes. The same can be said about Inter - played smart (- used a rather stricted play, though), but once the ball reached the defensive-midfield consisting of Cambiasso-Zanetti-Motta, Sneijder-Milito-Eto'o (the three attackers) had the ball within seconds right at their feets. Inter won the CL thanks to the creativity from the midfielders espcially, as they could counter any team within seconds. Just look at their goals from the quarter-finals and up - they came through counter-attacks that were finished within seconds.


    Old school defensive-midfielders...


    How Do We Solve It? Can We Solve It?
    I do not know how the future will hold for these old school defensive-midfielders, but with the fact that the pace of the game is developing very quickly in such a short periods, the old school midfielders might be gone or in a very limited majority in about 15-20 years. I made a research on the SM database of players under the age of 21 and within the ratings of 85-90 (the next generation defensive-midfielders) and out of 28 players, I could only list 11 players as pure old school midfielders (with the majority of them beeing listed as CB's, that is). This situation isn't as easy to solve as the situation with the defenders that played on the (wrong) flanks in the early days of the football history, as this situation is a more complicated one. Perhaps move up certain central-defenders type such as speedy (Ivan Cordoba comes to my mind) or strong ones that could be a threat to it's own team if he is near the penalty-area, as he perhaps isn't the most tactically skilled one. The latter would fit a player like Chivu perfectly, who has actually been tried out their at occasions in Serie A.
    Maybe you all disagree with me, though. I am just looking for a discussion, so discuss!
  24. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from John S in Death of the un-sung hero (?)   
    The Defensive-Midfielder

    What defines a defensive-midfielder?


    Introduction
    Well, I dedicate this thread to the fact that the modern football (on the pitch) has taken the shape of becoming a game where the pace is now faster than ever, which means that you need creative players who can find a way of lock up the other teams defence in no time. This of course leads to certain player characters beeing ''overfloded'' and perhaps in some cases, not even needed. It reminds me of the game in it's early days when left-footed, good defensive-wise players, had to plays as a right-back and vice-versa for the right-footed defender. The pace of the early days football was of course not even close to the pace we are currently seeing, but as the game has always went on to gain more and more pace, the coaches could not even have patience with the fact that the left/right-footed defender had to turn the ball over to it's ''best foot'' (which only is a difference of micro-secounds!). Luckily, the coaches started to ''correct'' the problem by taking the easy decision of playing left-footed defenders on the left and right-footed defenders on the right.
    Let Me Explain Myself
    Many say the market-prices of many players are sky high at the moment, but so is the pace of the football as well. These recent years, I've noticed that defensive-midfielders are becoming fewer and fewer of their own kind, so-to-say. The amount of deep-lying play-makers have only been growing and growing these recent years. Even SM suggests that my theory is quite right - Out 58 defensive-midfielders that are rated 90 or above in the game, 35 players are I'd count players who are confident with the ball and could very easily bring in some creativity to his team. That's on the verge of becoming 2/3 of the todays elite of defensive-midfielder.


    Mourinho wants Schweinsteiger at Madrid as well...


    Once again: The fact that you need creativity to split apart a good defence and the fact that the pace of the football has developed very much only these recent years, means that you need creativity to lock up a defence. Pure defensive-midfielder (like Mascherano or Lass doesn't have it) and maybe that is why coaches such as Mourinho and Guardiola chooses to give creative defensive-midfielders such as Khedira and the perhaps more questionable decision, Busquets, the start ahead of them? Those seconds in terms of passing-skill between the mastermind defensive-midfielder and the old school defensive-midfielder could be the seconds that are seprating teams apart.
    Xavi, a mastermind player, is now rumored to be the one (out of the trio) who will recieve the FIFA World Player of The Year Award. Many around this globe wanted him to win it last year as well and hailed him as a more worthy winner than Leo Messi, the (usual) fan favourite. Could this only be a coincidence...?
    Examples
    Another example is the flow Germany had in their game during the World Cup. Pretty much the Bundesliga itself, Germany produced an attacking football and with 4 players upfront (3 attacking-midfielder and 1 lonely striker), their pressure was mounting high up on the pitch. Not even the 3 men midfield of Serbia could hold up against 2 techincally skilled passing-players (and not to mention, creative ones) in Schewinsteiger and Khedira. Germany just pressured them down and split the three-men defensive-midfield apart with some fast combinations. The battle against Spain showed that the team with the best creativity in their squad would win, as Spain didn't use any old school defensive-midfielder. Ultimately, individual skills would seal through a winner. Spain has the best players in their setup - that's a fact, and despite playing bad for most games in the World Cup, Spain won the World Cup thanks to individual performances. Did Germany use any old school midfielder in the World Cup? No. Did they succed? Yes. Did Spain use any old school midfielder in the World Cup? No. Did they succed? Yes. The same can be said about Inter - played smart (- used a rather stricted play, though), but once the ball reached the defensive-midfield consisting of Cambiasso-Zanetti-Motta, Sneijder-Milito-Eto'o (the three attackers) had the ball within seconds right at their feets. Inter won the CL thanks to the creativity from the midfielders espcially, as they could counter any team within seconds. Just look at their goals from the quarter-finals and up - they came through counter-attacks that were finished within seconds.


    Old school defensive-midfielders...


    How Do We Solve It? Can We Solve It?
    I do not know how the future will hold for these old school defensive-midfielders, but with the fact that the pace of the game is developing very quickly in such a short periods, the old school midfielders might be gone or in a very limited majority in about 15-20 years. I made a research on the SM database of players under the age of 21 and within the ratings of 85-90 (the next generation defensive-midfielders) and out of 28 players, I could only list 11 players as pure old school midfielders (with the majority of them beeing listed as CB's, that is). This situation isn't as easy to solve as the situation with the defenders that played on the (wrong) flanks in the early days of the football history, as this situation is a more complicated one. Perhaps move up certain central-defenders type such as speedy (Ivan Cordoba comes to my mind) or strong ones that could be a threat to it's own team if he is near the penalty-area, as he perhaps isn't the most tactically skilled one. The latter would fit a player like Chivu perfectly, who has actually been tried out their at occasions in Serie A.
    Maybe you all disagree with me, though. I am just looking for a discussion, so discuss!
  25. Like
    Lensois got a reaction from Stuart H in Death of the un-sung hero (?)   
    The Defensive-Midfielder

    What defines a defensive-midfielder?


    Introduction
    Well, I dedicate this thread to the fact that the modern football (on the pitch) has taken the shape of becoming a game where the pace is now faster than ever, which means that you need creative players who can find a way of lock up the other teams defence in no time. This of course leads to certain player characters beeing ''overfloded'' and perhaps in some cases, not even needed. It reminds me of the game in it's early days when left-footed, good defensive-wise players, had to plays as a right-back and vice-versa for the right-footed defender. The pace of the early days football was of course not even close to the pace we are currently seeing, but as the game has always went on to gain more and more pace, the coaches could not even have patience with the fact that the left/right-footed defender had to turn the ball over to it's ''best foot'' (which only is a difference of micro-secounds!). Luckily, the coaches started to ''correct'' the problem by taking the easy decision of playing left-footed defenders on the left and right-footed defenders on the right.
    Let Me Explain Myself
    Many say the market-prices of many players are sky high at the moment, but so is the pace of the football as well. These recent years, I've noticed that defensive-midfielders are becoming fewer and fewer of their own kind, so-to-say. The amount of deep-lying play-makers have only been growing and growing these recent years. Even SM suggests that my theory is quite right - Out 58 defensive-midfielders that are rated 90 or above in the game, 35 players are I'd count players who are confident with the ball and could very easily bring in some creativity to his team. That's on the verge of becoming 2/3 of the todays elite of defensive-midfielder.


    Mourinho wants Schweinsteiger at Madrid as well...


    Once again: The fact that you need creativity to split apart a good defence and the fact that the pace of the football has developed very much only these recent years, means that you need creativity to lock up a defence. Pure defensive-midfielder (like Mascherano or Lass doesn't have it) and maybe that is why coaches such as Mourinho and Guardiola chooses to give creative defensive-midfielders such as Khedira and the perhaps more questionable decision, Busquets, the start ahead of them? Those seconds in terms of passing-skill between the mastermind defensive-midfielder and the old school defensive-midfielder could be the seconds that are seprating teams apart.
    Xavi, a mastermind player, is now rumored to be the one (out of the trio) who will recieve the FIFA World Player of The Year Award. Many around this globe wanted him to win it last year as well and hailed him as a more worthy winner than Leo Messi, the (usual) fan favourite. Could this only be a coincidence...?
    Examples
    Another example is the flow Germany had in their game during the World Cup. Pretty much the Bundesliga itself, Germany produced an attacking football and with 4 players upfront (3 attacking-midfielder and 1 lonely striker), their pressure was mounting high up on the pitch. Not even the 3 men midfield of Serbia could hold up against 2 techincally skilled passing-players (and not to mention, creative ones) in Schewinsteiger and Khedira. Germany just pressured them down and split the three-men defensive-midfield apart with some fast combinations. The battle against Spain showed that the team with the best creativity in their squad would win, as Spain didn't use any old school defensive-midfielder. Ultimately, individual skills would seal through a winner. Spain has the best players in their setup - that's a fact, and despite playing bad for most games in the World Cup, Spain won the World Cup thanks to individual performances. Did Germany use any old school midfielder in the World Cup? No. Did they succed? Yes. Did Spain use any old school midfielder in the World Cup? No. Did they succed? Yes. The same can be said about Inter - played smart (- used a rather stricted play, though), but once the ball reached the defensive-midfield consisting of Cambiasso-Zanetti-Motta, Sneijder-Milito-Eto'o (the three attackers) had the ball within seconds right at their feets. Inter won the CL thanks to the creativity from the midfielders espcially, as they could counter any team within seconds. Just look at their goals from the quarter-finals and up - they came through counter-attacks that were finished within seconds.


    Old school defensive-midfielders...


    How Do We Solve It? Can We Solve It?
    I do not know how the future will hold for these old school defensive-midfielders, but with the fact that the pace of the game is developing very quickly in such a short periods, the old school midfielders might be gone or in a very limited majority in about 15-20 years. I made a research on the SM database of players under the age of 21 and within the ratings of 85-90 (the next generation defensive-midfielders) and out of 28 players, I could only list 11 players as pure old school midfielders (with the majority of them beeing listed as CB's, that is). This situation isn't as easy to solve as the situation with the defenders that played on the (wrong) flanks in the early days of the football history, as this situation is a more complicated one. Perhaps move up certain central-defenders type such as speedy (Ivan Cordoba comes to my mind) or strong ones that could be a threat to it's own team if he is near the penalty-area, as he perhaps isn't the most tactically skilled one. The latter would fit a player like Chivu perfectly, who has actually been tried out their at occasions in Serie A.
    Maybe you all disagree with me, though. I am just looking for a discussion, so discuss!
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