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Juan Antonio - A Relatively Late Bloomer.


Lensois
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Brescia-saljer-Antonio-och-Berardi-till-Sampdoria-Leali-till-Juventus.jpg

Antonio must be thankfull for where he is today given his deep up's and down's in his fairly short career.

At 24 years of age, Juan Antonio is a fairly late bloomer. However, saying that, the aura around his rise within Italy would have been a lot more recognized worldwide if it wasn't for his age. From the streets of Trelew, which of course isn't the traditional Hispanic name of city and the name really orgins from the Welsh settlers who settled in the southern parts of Argentina in the 19th century, his ride to the Italian rivera hasn't been heading a straight direction all the time.

Antonio got a straight kick-off in his career after his move to Comodoro Rivadavia, where was labelled as one of the finest talents Argentina had within the category of late 80's (remember that Agüero and Messi were born around that time as well) and got that magical phone call every footballing teens can only dream about from the then Argentinian U-17 coach, Hugo Tocalli. Paired up with Agüero upfront in the U-17's version of Copa America, Argentina were in a shocking state and didn't even progress from their group.

Around here, the setbacks started to hit him.

It all started smoothly, though. His displays at the tournament attracted a certain team to approach his agent - his Italy-journey could have started here already - with Inter. However, for the best sake of his career and for the sake of Argentinian football, he moved to the team with the perhaps biggest history in Argentina: The River club. This was all in 2005. It all started fluently for the young Juan as the coach Daniel Passarella, the man who conviced him to stay in his native Argentina, had faith in him and gave him the minutes he needed. A year later though, things weren't really the same.

The Argentinian outfit were suffering economically-speaking and were forced to sell talented players such as Gonzalo Higuaín, Mateo Musacchio and Fernando Belluschi. Juan initially wanted to leave too, but was conviced once again by Passarella to stay in Argentina. A few weeks later, Passarella was gone, so was practically the whole board and Juan dragged on a serious injury. An injury that'd see him miss several months of the 2006/07 season. He never really regained the other coaches notice and was faiding away on the River-bench. For the facts nerds: Just see his stats at transfermarket between the years 2006 to 2010.

NEWS_1321196250_Corioni_Getty.jpg

Grazie mille, is what I believe Juan has already said to the Brescia president, Corioni.

Until 2010. Thanks to president Corioni being desperate in new signings prior to their first Serie A campaign in five years, cheaply signings were preferred as per usual for a newcomer and at a cost of 0m €, Juan Antonio simply couldn't be a miss. However, Juan wasn't deemed ready for Serie A football and was soon moving on to the south - with Ascoli, more namely. Things didn't go his way there and alongside fighting for minutes, he struggled with injuries.

The next season, with Brescia being relegated back to the B, several key-players left the demolished building and as per usual, Corioni didn't spend too much of the money he received from those players. A player such as Juan Antonio had now, around a half decade ever since his latest period of success, a golden chance to prove what he was really made of. Starring in a creative trequarista role in newly arrived coach Scienza's XI, Antonio really stormed Italy with his displays. By January, the Lombardy region had found its new Kaká and Juan became a fan favourit.

As suspected though, Corioni is all about profit and made the somewhat disasterous decision of selling the Argentinian to a fellow top candidate in Sampdoria for an undisclosed amount, but which has been outspoken to be around 2m €. Thereby, his value has risen with ~200% within the space of a year and a half in a lower-ranked and valued league.

That has got to say something, no?

Characteristics

  • A trequartista.

  • Very similar to traditional trequartista's such as Pastore and more famously, Kaká. Fan favourite, in other words.

  • Has a decent eye for creating dangerous counter-attacks and locking up some free space for others with a quick pass.

  • Minus note: Can disappear in some games, which is fully understandable though - remember that it's his first full season within the space of half a decade.

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Re: Juan Antonio - A Relatively Late Bloomer.

Brescia-saljer-Antonio-och-Berardi-till-Sampdoria-Leali-till-Juventus.jpg

At 24 years of age' date=' Juan Antonio is a fairly late bloomer. However, saying that, the aura around his rise within Italy would have been a lot more recognized worldwide if it wasn't for his age. From the streets of Trelew, which of course isn't the traditional Hispanic name of city and the name really orgins from the Welsh settlers who settled in the southern parts of Argentina in the 19th century, his ride to the Italian rivera hasn't been heading a straight direction all the time.

Antonio got a straight kick-off in his career after his move to Comodoro Rivadavia, where was labelled as one of the finest talents Argentina had within the category of late 80's (remember that Agüero and Messi were born around that time as well) and got that magical phone call every footballing teens can only dream about from the then Argentinian U-17 coach, Hugo Tocalli. Paired up with Agüero upfront in the U-17's version of Copa America, Argentina were in a shocking state and didn't even progress from their group.

Around here, the setbacks started to hit him.

It all started smoothly, though. His displays at the tournament attracted a certain team to approach his agent - his Italy-journey could have started here already - with Inter. However, for the best sake of his career and for the sake of Argentinian football, he moved to the team with the perhaps biggest history in Argentina: The River club. This was all in 2005. It all started fluently for the young Juan as the coach Daniel Passarella, the man who conviced him to stay in his native Argentina, had faith in him and gave the minutes he needed. A year later though, things weren't the same.

The Argentinian outfit were suffering economically-speaking and were forced to sell talented players in Higuaín, Musacchio and Higuaín. Juan initially wanted to leave but was conviced once again by Passarella to stay in Argentina. A few weeks later, Passarella was gone, so was practically the whole board and Juan dragged on a serious injury. An injury that'd see him miss several months of the 2006/07 season. He never really regained the other coaches notice and was faiding away on the River-bench.

Until 2010. Thanks to president Corioni being desperate in new signings prior to their first Serie A campaign in five years, cheaply signings were preferred as per usual for a newcomer and at a cost of 0m €, Juan Antonio simply couldn't be a miss. However, Juan wasn't deemed ready for Serie A football and was soon moving on to the south - and Ascoli, more namely. Things didn't go his way there and alongside fighting for minutes, he struggled with injuries.

The next season, with Brescia being relegated back to the B, several key-players left the demolished building and as per usual, Corioni didn't spend too much of the money he received from those players. A player such as Juan Antonio had now, around a half decade ever since his latest period of success, a golden chance to prove what he's really made of. Starring in a creative trequarista role in newly arrived coach Scienza's XI, Antonio really stormed Italy with his displays. By January, the Lombardy region had found its new Kaká and Juan became a fan favourit.

As suspected though, Corioni is all about profit and made the somewhat disasterous decision of selling the Argentinian to a fellow top candidate in Sampdoria for an undisclosed amount, but which has been spoken to be around 2m €. Thereby, his value has risen with ~200% within the space of a year and a half in a lower-ranked and valued league.

That has got to say something, no?

Characteristics

  • A trequartista.

  • Very similar to traditional trequartista's such as Pastore and more famously, Kaká. Fan favourite, in other words.

  • Has a decent eye for creating dangerous counter-attacks and locking up some free space for other with a quick pass.

  • Minus note: Can disappear in some games, which is fully understandable though - remember that it's his first full season within the space of half a decade.

on transfermarkt he have just 23.

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Re: Juan Antonio - A Relatively Late Bloomer.

Excellent write up. i was tracking this guy since day one of this serie B season. Having come through the youth ranks playing alongside todays superstars such as Aguero & Higuain, the boy must of had something, all it took was a bit of nuturing.

He seems to have battled through his injuries, perhaps to do with his physical development, he now is starting to show what he can do.

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