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Re: The Random Thread

today i played tennis.

Nice buddy' date=' did you win? :)

LOL..Hi mate, I just went to the loo...& I'd just like to say everything went...OK :) well within reason...actually not good..not good at all :mad: But Im recovering now, I think its all over :) (brrrrp)..OH, hang-on...i need go check :(

Oh, I've been there... :o

Good luck, mate! ;)

Sweet! Today I wrestled my Cat for a chicken leg...an lost!!!

I knew I shouldnt of fed her those protein shakes :mad:

:D

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What sort of school do you attend? Is it a private school... God damn some of these assignments are hard for 11 year olds. And you have better spelling that a few forumers on here.

or perhaps he goes to a public school and our education system is terrible compared to theirs. Even Pakistan have a better education system than ours. :o

@Villa - if you ever need a manager/agent, you can always contact me and I'll send you my CV. ;)

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Re: The Random Thread

or perhaps he goes to a public school and our education system is terrible compared to theirs. Even Pakistan have a better education system than ours. :o

@Villa - if you ever need a manager/agent' date=' you can always contact me and I'll send you my CV. ;)[/quote']

Yeah... Our education system does suck! :o

Stay back... I'm his agent and I take 30% commission B)

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Re: The Random Thread

our teacher said like :

its a comic. i dont care care how u draw it as long u show that you know what the red river rebellion is about...

I like a bit of history, this is what I know of it...

The Hudson Bay Company (HBC) agreed to sell much of its northwest territory to the Canadian government for a price of $1.5 million. The HBC managed to retain 45 000 acres of land.

The official date of the land transfer was to be December 1, 1869. At this time, the population of this region, called Rupertsland, consisted primarily of Métis. Out of a total population of 12 000:

2000 English

10 000 Metis

Some welcomed the transfer. A group within the English minority called themselves the Canadian Party. They were situated in Portage la Prairie. They welcomed the land transfer, because they believed that more migration from the east would turn their status into majority status.

The Métis were not as enthusiastic. They feared the land transfer would cause them to lose important cultural aspects of their lives, such as:

Language – they were French-speaking

Religion – they were Catholic, whereas much of English Canada was Protestant

Land rights – they would no longer be able to live nomadic life.

Matters would heat up in the next couple of months as Louis Riel, a 25-year-old Métis man, who was born in St. Boniface and educated in Montreal, would take up the Métis cause. The first thing he did, to get the attention of the federal government, was to set up a blockade at the American border, so that surveyors could not get in.

Next, the National Committee of Métis arrived at Pembina and blocked William McDougall, the appointed new Lieutenant Governor of the Northwest. With McDougall blocked, technically there was no government in Manitoba. Riel then seized Upper Fort Garry, in Winnipeg, and established a Provisional Government.

The Provisional Government did not wish to hinder the land transfer, but rather to establish a “bill of rights” for the inhabitants already living there. When December 1, 1869 rolled around, McDougall attempted to stake the federal claim to the land, but to no avail.

Prime Minister John A. Macdonald wanted to delay the transfer to that negotiations could drag out.

William MacTavish, the head of the HBC, did not want to delay. MacTavish released his authority of the land. The Métis demands, in effect, were now Macdonald’s problem.

The negotiations now had a definite sense of urgency, and Macdonald would send Donald Smith to Fort Garry to negotiate on behalf of the federal government. Essentially, the provisional government was trying to negotiate a “bill of rights” on the following key issues:

English and French are recognized as common languages in the Legislature and the courts.

The Lieutenant Governor be proficient in both French and English

The judges of the Supreme Court be fluent in both French and English

A free homestead law

A peaceful solution seemed to be developing. In fact, on January 20, 1870, open communication had developed between Smith and the public at Fort Garry. It was not to last, however.

A group of armed soldiers from the Canadian Party attacked the Fort. The group was led by Thomas Scott. 48 members of this group, including Thomas Scott, were taken prisoner.

Thomas Scott was put on trial by the Provisional Government. Found guilty of hostility toward the provisional government and other crimes, he was executed on March 4, 1870.

The results:

The death of an Ontario man at Métis hands caused great outrage in the rest of Canada.

The execution of Scott forced Macdonald to send troops out west to capture Riel.

Colonel Wolseley was sent with troops to settle things down. It took him 3 months just to arrive.

Riel escaped to the United States and the Provisional Government came to an end.

Even though Riel was in the U.S., the negotiations carried out with Smith were realized in the form of the Manitoba Act.

The act was passed on May 12, 1870.

On July 15, 1870, the bill went into effect, creating the province of Manitoba.

Manitoba’s boundaries were only a fraction of what they are today. The boundary extended about as far north as the Interlake region, as far east as Whiteshell, and as far west as Brandon.

Riel went on to win an election to represent Manitoba in the House of Commons.

Of course, if he ever showed his face in Ottawa, he would be met by an angry mob.

Riel remained in the U.S., where he worked as a schoolteacher.

He did not re-surface in Canada until 1884.

Not sure how you write a comic about it though, but these are the important bits of the Red River Rebellion which essentially was the after effects of setting up a provisional government.

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its public...but i am gifted....

Oh' date=' I remember you mentioning it on this thread. :)

our teacher said like :

its a comic. i dont care care how u draw it as long u show that you know what the red river rebellion is about...

:confused::o

I like a bit of history' date=' this is what I know of it...

The Hudson Bay Company (HBC) agreed to sell much of its northwest territory to the Canadian government for a price of $1.5 million. The HBC managed to retain 45 000 acres of land.

The official date of the land transfer was to be December 1, 1869. At this time, the population of this region, called Rupertsland, consisted primarily of Métis. Out of a total population of 12 000:

2000 English

10 000 Metis

Some welcomed the transfer. A group within the English minority called themselves the Canadian Party. They were situated in Portage la Prairie. They welcomed the land transfer, because they believed that more migration from the east would turn their status into majority status.

The Métis were not as enthusiastic. They feared the land transfer would cause them to lose important cultural aspects of their lives, such as:

Language – they were French-speaking

Religion – they were Catholic, whereas much of English Canada was Protestant

Land rights – they would no longer be able to live nomadic life.

Matters would heat up in the next couple of months as Louis Riel, a 25-year-old Métis man, who was born in St. Boniface and educated in Montreal, would take up the Métis cause. The first thing he did, to get the attention of the federal government, was to set up a blockade at the American border, so that surveyors could not get in.

Next, the National Committee of Métis arrived at Pembina and blocked William McDougall, the appointed new Lieutenant Governor of the Northwest. With McDougall blocked, technically there was no government in Manitoba. Riel then seized Upper Fort Garry, in Winnipeg, and established a Provisional Government.

The Provisional Government did not wish to hinder the land transfer, but rather to establish a “bill of rights” for the inhabitants already living there. When December 1, 1869 rolled around, McDougall attempted to stake the federal claim to the land, but to no avail.

Prime Minister John A. Macdonald wanted to delay the transfer to that negotiations could drag out.

William MacTavish, the head of the HBC, did not want to delay. MacTavish released his authority of the land. The Métis demands, in effect, were now Macdonald’s problem.

The negotiations now had a definite sense of urgency, and Macdonald would send Donald Smith to Fort Garry to negotiate on behalf of the federal government. Essentially, the provisional government was trying to negotiate a “bill of rights” on the following key issues:

English and French are recognized as common languages in the Legislature and the courts.

The Lieutenant Governor be proficient in both French and English

The judges of the Supreme Court be fluent in both French and English

A free homestead law

A peaceful solution seemed to be developing. In fact, on January 20, 1870, open communication had developed between Smith and the public at Fort Garry. It was not to last, however.

A group of armed soldiers from the Canadian Party attacked the Fort. The group was led by Thomas Scott. 48 members of this group, including Thomas Scott, were taken prisoner.

Thomas Scott was put on trial by the Provisional Government. Found guilty of hostility toward the provisional government and other crimes, he was executed on March 4, 1870.

The results:

The death of an Ontario man at Métis hands caused great outrage in the rest of Canada.

The execution of Scott forced Macdonald to send troops out west to capture Riel.

Colonel Wolseley was sent with troops to settle things down. It took him 3 months just to arrive.

Riel escaped to the United States and the Provisional Government came to an end.

Even though Riel was in the U.S., the negotiations carried out with Smith were realized in the form of the Manitoba Act.

The act was passed on May 12, 1870.

On July 15, 1870, the bill went into effect, creating the province of Manitoba.

Manitoba’s boundaries were only a fraction of what they are today. The boundary extended about as far north as the Interlake region, as far east as Whiteshell, and as far west as Brandon.

Riel went on to win an election to represent Manitoba in the House of Commons.

Of course, if he ever showed his face in Ottawa, he would be met by an angry mob.

Riel remained in the U.S., where he worked as a schoolteacher.

He did not re-surface in Canada until 1884.

Not sure how you write a comic about it though, but these are the important bits of the Red River Rebellion which essentially was the after effects of setting up a provisional government.[/quote']

Good seeing you on this thread, mate.

This is the best place in the forum imo.

We've lived some epic moments here... ;)

Btw kudos for helping Zlooky!

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Re: The Random Thread

Good seeing you on this thread' date=' mate.

This is the best place in the forum imo.

We've lived some epic moments here... ;)

Btw kudos for helping Zlooky![/quote']

Glanced at it from time to time, but never taken the time to post.

Seems this is the place where Zlooky comes into his own ;). No worries, i enjoy reading about world conflicts and taken plenty of notes on them. I hope the info is accurate and gd luck with the assignment Zlooks

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