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This is the thread for posting news about either the PSP or the PS3 as they are the most recent 2 consoles or handheld games released in the Playstation series. I have had a PS3 for a while now and have had a PSP for almost 2 years and i am a big games fan and i am also a fan of the Playstation series. I will post regular updates on this thread about PS3 and PSP games and news.

I will stay regular with this thread and if you want any help on information then i will give it to you the best as i can as i think of myself as a very smart game boff on these 2 consoles/handheld.

So start posting as i am interested to see how many of you have either one of these games machines as i imagine many of you do. So start posting about recent Playstation news, have a chat about the latest games, which games to buy or even just a bit of general chit chat about the games machines. If you have any of that stuff then post it here.

Have fun. :) :) :) :)

PS3 rating chart -

1) Assassins Creed - 93%

2) Call Of Duty 4 : Modern Warfare - 88%

PSP rating chart -

1) Fifa 08 - 85%

2) The Simpsons Game - 78%

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Re: PS3 and PSP

Nice thread :)

quick question for the PS-Master ;)

How to you think the Sony brand is comparing to the Microsoft and Nintendo brands?

Mainly the battles between 360 and Ps3' date='and PSP against DS

:)[/quote']

Well from my point of view i think that the PSP is much better than the DS from a real gamers point of view. When i say that i mean it has good graphics, good game play and generates good sound effect. Where as the DS is much like the Wii where it is more of a fun mess around game machine. I think the PSP is a much better games machine than the DS and is the best hand held console so far. The PS3 and the Xbox 360 are both very good next generation gaming machines, and they both have the same sort of special abilities. I think that the PS3 has slightly better graphics and it also has free online gaming. Although the Xbox 360 has many great games out where as the PS3 has very few top quality games so because of this reason i would say the Xbox 360 is currently better but only because it has better games. Although when the PS3 has been out for a longer period of time the games will improve in quality but until then the Xbox 360 is slightly better.

So to sum up i believe the PSP is better than the DS and that the Xbox 360 is currently better than the PS3 although as time passes and better games come out for it that will then be better than the Xbox 360. :)

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Re: PS3 and PSP

call-of-duty-4.jpg

The new call of duty game and the first one on the PS3 will it be a hit or will it be a flop??

The Good -

Very high quality campaign mode with unexpected moments - Well designed online multi player - Great sound effects.

The Bad -

Very short campaign mode.

Here is a very short review of the game done by myself -

It took awhile, but Infinity Ward finally got the message that World War II is played out. With modern times and international affairs becoming more and more, shall we say, interesting in recent years, the 1940s just don't carry as much weight as they used to. Perhaps that's why Call of Duty 4 has a new subtitle, Modern Warfare. By bringing things into a fictionalized story that still seems fairly plausible, the developer has made a much heavier game. But COD 4 is more than just an updated setting. It's also an amazing multiplayer first-person shooter and a great but brief single-player campaign with the visual chops to make it a standout shooter in an era filled with seemingly dozens of standout shooters.

Here is the official website -

http://www.callofduty.com/

So what do you guys think about the game and what rating would you give it.

Arsenal 123's rating - 88%

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Re: PS3 and PSP

Well I played the demo yesterday for the pc and I am currently downloading it from valve as i thought it was amazing even though I had to turn a few things off so it wouldn't lag. Excellent game can't wait to play multi-player online but I still like day of defeat better.:P

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Re: PS3 and PSP

Assassins Creed

Here is my own review hope you enjoy.

Assassin's Creed will stay with you long after you finish it. Here is one of the most unique gameworlds ever created: beautiful, memorable, and alive. Every crack and crevasse is filled with gorgeous, subtle details, from astounding visual flourishes to overheard cries for help. But it's more than just a world--it's a fun and exciting action game with a ton of stuff to do and places to explore, rounded out with silky-smooth controls and a complex story that will slowly grab you the more you play. Make no mistake: Assassin's Creed is one of the best efforts of the year and a must-own game for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 owners.

Not enough can be said about the living, breathing world that you'll inhabit in Assassin's Creed. As assassin extraordinaire Altaïr, you'll explore three major cities of the Holy Land in the 12th century: Jerusalem, Damascus, and Acre. Each city is beautifully rendered from top to bottom and features meticulously crafted towers that reach for the sky, bustling market squares, and quiet corners where citizens converse and drunks lie in wait to accost you. As you wander the streets (and rooftops), you'll push your way through crowds of women carrying jars on their heads, hear orators shout political and religious wisdom, and watch town guards harass innocent victims. Altaïr has a profound effect on this world, but the cities are entities all their own, with their own flows and personalities.

The visual design has a lot to do with how believably organic everything feels. The cities are absolutely huge, and though you don't get full exploration privileges in the first few chapters, they eventually open up to let you travel seamlessly from one side to another. Everything is beautifully lit with just the right amount of bloom effect, and almost everything casts a shadow, from tall pillars to Altaïr's cloak. In fact, sometimes the shadows get to be a bit much and may make you think for a moment that there is artifacting on your screen, when in fact it's a character's head casting a shadow on his or her own neck. Every object, from scaffolds to pottery, is textured so finely you feel as if you could reach out and touch it. Animations are almost as equally well done. Altaïr scales walls, leaps majestically from towers, and engages in swashbuckling swordfights that would make Errol Flynn proud. And he does it all with fluid ease, generally moving from one pose to another without a hitch. Minor characters move gracefully as well, though one of the game's few visual drawbacks is the occasional jerky animation on the part of a citizen. However, it's easy to forgive, considering that the cities are populated with thousands and thousands of individuals. In fact, these tiny blemishes are noticeable only because everything else looks so incredible.

What you hear is even more impressive than what you see. At the top of a temple, you hear little but the rush of wind, the twittering of birds, and the barking of a far-off dog. In the most populated areas, your ears will fill with the din of street vendors, the pleas of beggars, and the occasional humming. It's never too much, though, and the game does a good job of making sure you hear what you need to hear (for example, the cries of citizens who need your help), without filling your ears with pointless noise. All these effects, along with the clangs of swords and groans of assassinated foes, are outstanding. The voice acting of the supporting cast is similarly remarkable. Conversations are completely believable and delivered with the perfect amount of solemn dignity. Oddly, the weakest link is Altaïr himself. Actor Philip Shahbaz does an all right job, but he isn't up to par with the first-rate acting of his fellow troupe. Rounding it all out is a beautiful orchestral score that is most notable for its subtlety. Many of the game's most impressive moments are accompanied by lovely musical themes that add even more threads to the game's rich living tapestry.

Fortunately, the story that binds it all together rises to the occasion. Actually, there are two related stories in play. The unfolding drama of Crusades-era Palestine is a mere memory, forcibly pulled from a modern-day bartender named Desmond by a resolute researcher using a machine called an animus. The memories aren't Desmond's own--they are Altaïr's, stored safely in the hapless subject's genetic code. We follow Altaïr as he assassinates nine public figures at the command of his master, and as the common thread that ties these men comes into focus, so does the true identity of Desmond's captors. There are no cutscenes in the traditional sense; every bit of story exposition and dialogue flows smoothly from the gameplay and takes place entirely within the game engine. The ending is confusing, and it blatantly leaves open the possibility of a sequel, but it's a small blemish on an otherwise stirring tale. Altaïr's world is not one of absolutes. His assassination targets aren't always evil, and Altaïr isn't always likable. As he is fond of reminding us, "Nothing is true. Everything is permitted."

Of course, such an authentic world would be meaningless without a lot of fun things to do in it. Thankfully, Assassin's Creed is endlessly entertaining in that it features a fine mix of stealthy exploration, tight platforming, and exciting combat. To discover the whereabouts of your assassination targets, you must first follow up on possible leads. There are several different mission types in this regard. In some cases, you sit on a bench and listen in on secret conversations. At other times, you will closely follow someone carrying an important letter that you'll pickpocket. Alternately, you can beat the information out of your target. Most missions are relatively easy to pull off in the early stages of the game. But once the guards and townspeople start recognizing you (or you alert them to your presence too close to the scene of one of your crimes), they get a little tougher.

There are also some optional tasks, such as rescuing innocent townspeople from the clutches of guards. The reward for doing so is a group of vigilantes who will hang out in the area afterward and hinder any foes chasing you. It's also a good way to try out Assassin's Creed's combat, which is surprisingly satisfying, considering the game's focus on sneaking around. You can pounce on enemies using your hidden blade (an incredibly rewarding one-stab kill), or use throwing daggers to take enemies down from a distance. However, your sword is your melee mainstay, and though the hack-and-slash combat may seem simple at first, it gets more challenging once you unlock the various countermoves. Often, you'll have a dozen or more attackers to fend off at once, but though these fights can be a little tricky, you'll never feel as if you're in over your head. In fact, the few circumstances in which you are forced into combat--such as a late-game boss fight against a seemingly endless crowd of attackers and their leering leader--are challenging and require some pitch-perfect timing to counter every strike and lunge.

Nevertheless, brute force is rarely the best way to handle a situation. You want to slink unnoticed through the crowds, but you can draw attention to yourself in a number of ways--whether it be galloping past a guard station on a horse, knocking pottery off of someone's head, or getting so frustrated by the various beggars that you fling them away from you. (And trust us--these are the most aggressive panhandlers you'll ever meet.) If you antagonize the guards, they'll give chase. Yes, you can stick around and fight, and though it's never the easiest option, breaking stealth does not **** you to death like it does in other sneaking games. But why not lure them to a rooftop? Once up there, you can grab them and fling them to the street below. Or if there are too many of them, you can jump across the rooftops gracefully until you find a hiding place, such as a nice bale of hay or a curtained garden. Once you're hidden, they'll break chase and you'll be free to roam about.

You can also seek refuge in small groups of scholars who serve as mobile hiding places. It's a bit contrived to walk into a stationary cluster of scholars and have them suddenly start moving simply because you're there, but it gets the job done. Actually, if there's any drawback to the usually excellent gameplay, it's how synthetic certain elements feel. Vigilantes are always in the same spot, missions reset if you don't get them right the first time, and those same guards will be harrassing that citizen, an hour after you pass by. It's easy to forgive these quirks though, given the easygoing flow of the world surrounding these pockets of gameplay.

Climbing up buildings and jumping around the rooftops is fun and breezy, thanks to effortless controls that strike a great balance between ease of use and player input. You can leap across alleys and scale walls with the pull of a trigger and the press of a button, and though it's possible to launch yourself from a wall or hurtle through a vendor's booth by accident, these moments aren't very common. You'd think that a city specifically designed to let you climb structures and caper about the roofs would look overly artificial, yet there's never a moment when you will think to yourself, "Wow, that looks like a place where I'm supposed to jump." The architecture looks completely natural, which makes Altaïr's abilities all the more exciting to pull off. The environments don't look as if they were created for him to climb around on; he just uses the hand he's been dealt, as any good assassin should.

In Assassin's Creed, the greatest joy comes from the smallest details, and for every nerve-racking battle, there's a quiet moment that cuts to the game's heart and soul. Climbing towers to uncover portions of the map is a simple mechanic but forever satisfying, thanks to the beautiful vistas and soft musical themes that accompany the view. Even the drunks that pester you are amusing and fun, though their constant shoving is more than annoying, especially if you are trying to pickpocket a pedestrian or eliminate a target without a fuss. It all makes your missions that much more compelling, and you'll be inclined to explore every nook and cranny and take on every optional task, just for the fun of it. There's a ton of stuff to do, and even when you've exhausted your official tasks, you can search for the collectible flags and crosses strewn around the cities and countryside. You could probably plow through the main quest in 20 hours if you're lucky, but completists might spend close to 50 hours finishing every quest and gathering every collectible.

There are few differences between the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 versions. PS3 owners are blessed with a slightly more solid frame rate, although the 360 version features a little more contrast in the lighting, so it's pretty much a wash. But regardless of which platform you go with, you'll have an amazing and unforgettable game. Assassin's Creed is the kind of game you tell your friends about, and one that should be in your collection.

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Arsenal 123 Rating - 93%

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Re: PS3 and PSP

Nice thread here mate' date=' good idea and a good review on assassins creed - it is truly a great game although i have played it on the 360 not the ps3.

Are we really supposed to believe that you wrote that review tho? ;)[/quote']

I did honestly m8 the only bit that isn't mine is the first paragraph because i am bad at getting stuff like this started. ;)

I have only purchased Assassins Creed recently 5 days ago to be exact but i have found that the visuals are amazing and for me that is the best bit in the game.

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Re: PS3 and PSP

Any recommended games for the PSP? Not CoD4' date=' PES, FIFA or Asassins Creed because I have them for 360, and want a different game that I can get into on the PSP :)

Cheers :)[/quote']

Well what sort of games do you like m8????

The game that i have been immersed in the most is Final Fantasy Tactics : War of the lions. As it says in the title that is a tactical game and if you like those sort of games i would defiantly recommend it. ;)

If you like action/strategy sort of games then i would recommend Metal Gear Solid : Portable ops. It is another great series from a fantastic series of games. Although i will have to warn you the difficulty is tough even when set in Normal mode.

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Re: PS3 and PSP

Well what sort of games do you like m8????

The game that i have been immersed in the most is Final Fantasy Tactics : War of the lions. As it says in the title that is a tactical game and if you like those sort of games i would defiantly recommend it. ;)

If you like action/strategy sort of games then i would recommend Metal Gear Solid : Portable ops. It is another great series from a fantastic series of games. Although i will have to warn you the difficulty is tough even when set in Normal mode.

I like MGS, just as long as it isn't a card game again :mad:

I like action games, I don't want sports games for the PSP :)

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Re: PS3 and PSP

The Simpsons Game : PSP

It's no secret that Simpsons is a veteran of a game series. From its domination in the arcades to its jumps to major platforms, Simpsons has been around for a while. However, none of the games have really made that extra jump to be a super game, and this one is no different. It has some clever ideas and some nice fun play, but this one is only going to appeal to big fans.

The Simpsons Game sets you up in the very famous city of Springfield. The story is not one to remember though. It basically starts with Bart going to buy the Grand Theft Scratchy video game when his mom catches him and takes it. Then Bart finds a Simpsons video game manual and every character finds they have some kind of power. The power are nothing special and although necessary for the game the individual characters' special power are quite bland. The missions basically set you up as two characters as you maneuver through worlds that suit them. For example one of the earlier missions is when Lisa convinces Bart to go save trees and he is persuaded to go because he will fight lots of bad guys. The game takes you on a large variety of missions, but its seems like its all been done before, and it is nothing special.

The Simpsons game takes Matt Groening's classic Simpsons characters and makes them look very much the same, though what's nice is that they seem to have a 3D look to them. It sounds cool and it is but the edges of the characters are very jagged. Nevertheless the characters move very smoothly and the frame rate is very consistent. Occasionally the camera does get a bit annoying but it is also still good, and it is a very good looking game.

And finally, what would Simpsons be without all the sounds that brought it to life. None of it is missing. There is plenty of humor in this game and it is all completely original. The Simpsons song is in it and of course the characters wonderful voices are apparent in this game. The are plenty of sound effects, but none of them come from reacting to the environment.

Simpsons is nothing special as far as a game goes, however there are plenty of great ideas and there is some fun play to be had. The game will probably mostly appeal to hardcore fans.

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Arsenal 123's Rating - 78%

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Re: PS3 and PSP

FIFA 08 : PSP

You've got to hand it to EA Sports--whatever the platform, the developer knows how to take advantage of the hardware. FIFA 08 for the PlayStation Portable offers pretty much everything you could ask of a handheld football game, with local and online multiplayer, multiple game modes, and the ability to transfer data to and from the PlayStation 2. It also plays a solid game of football, and while it's not up to the standard of the home console versions, it's definitely fun to play.

EA Sports has crammed a lot into the game this year, and much of the content is exclusive to the PSP. While there are the usual quick match and tournament options, the supplementary modes really add a lot of longevity to the game. Take the football IQ mode, for example: It's a football quiz where you answer questions to score goals. If you correctly answer successive questions, your team dribbles the ball toward the goal, and if you answer incorrectly it comes back toward your own. Reach the goal and you have to answer two difficult questions in order to score, and if the other team is in a similar position you must give the right answer to save it. The game begins with easy questions about your favourite team and league, then moves on to other leagues and countries as you progress.

The football IQ mode won't last too long, but there are plenty of other games on offer. Like the other console versions, the PSP now offers interactive leagues, allowing you to head online and represent your favourite team against people from all around the world. Fixtures occur at around the same time as the real-world matches themselves, and the overall results are fed into a central database that tracks all the versions of the game. Every result has an effect on the virtual standing of your team, and for fans it's a nice accompaniment to the real football season. You'll find that there are a lot more people who want to play as popular teams such as Manchester United, but you can play as many matches as you like as long as you can find opponents.

In fact, the interactive league is just one part of a very accomplished online mode. If you have a Wi-Fi connection to the Internet, you can create an EA account and log in for various game modes and live ESPN score updates. The simplest is the "play now" option, which automatically pairs you up with someone else who's looking for a game, but there's also a lobby system if you want to type messages to people before you begin. It's a sophisticated system when compared to other PSP football offerings, and the only downside we saw was the limited number of people playing when we looked for a game. While the general online performance was good, with relatively little lag, we did encounter a high number of disconnections during the game. It was difficult to determine whether that was from users quitting or from a technical problem, but it did sour the experience.

Even if you don't have an Internet connection, there's plenty to keep you occupied in FIFA 08. Many features have been carried over from last year, including the challenge and manager modes, but both have been tweaked and expanded for this outing. The challenge mode now offers 61 matches with preset criteria, so you might be starting the match 10--or even 45--minutes in with the aim of winning the game by two goals. The manager mode gives you a much more hands-on role at your club, with player training and transfers as well as the board and the media to deal with. You get e-mails from the board of directors and scouts and receive actual newspapers such as The Sun with headlines from your league. It's not as deep as the dedicated management sims, which really let you get into the nitty-gritty of formations and tactics, but it offers probably the deepest challenge in the game. The new addition this year is the opportunity to arrange up to four preseason friendly matches. It's not a big change, but it lets you better adapt your training and final player lineup ahead of the main season.

As well as the above modes, FIFA 08 has a couple of neat minigames. The first is juggling, which is very similar to the one featured in the Wii version of the game. Playing as any of the 12,600 players in the game, you have to play the old training game of keepy-uppy by tapping out the commands shown onscreen. The longer you keep the ball in the air, the more your player levels up. Wall attack is another minigame where you have to volley balls at a large wall, knocking bricks down to score points. Bricks with symbols give you point multipliers and bonuses, and you can adjust the power of your shot to hit different heights by using pass, cross, or kick.

While FIFA 08 is a feature-rich package, the game itself isn't quite as solid as we'd like. The controls feel imprecise, partly because of the PSP's hardware design, but mostly because of some patchy player animations. It looks as though frames of animation are missing, most noticeably when players make a sliding tackle, and that all-important feeling of fluidity is missing as a result. Perhaps the animation was simplified to keep the game running smoothly, but player and stadium details are still quite low. It's actually difficult to pick out individual player likenesses or distinguish stadiums from the default camera angle.

Other versions of FIFA have offered a slower, more thoughtful game of football this year, whereas the PSP version feels closer to last year's game. There's certainly little evidence of improved artificial intelligence, as you'll find you can still cut through the defence with a single man. The result is that while FIFA 08 is relatively easy to get into, it has less long-term appeal in its core modes than we'd have hoped. It's also worth mentioning that the trick system is unchanged and still quite difficult to employ using the L button. This gives little for advanced players to take advantage of, and games can feel scrappier as a result.

FIFA 08 is an officially licensed game, and the overall presentation is exemplary. There are 50 licensed music tracks from artists as varied as Cansei de ser Sexy and Bodyrox, but they all fit the game's tone. In addition, any music on your memory stick is automatically imported to play alongside the default tracks. The EA Media Center lets you mix and match your favourite songs, as well as listen to them alongside a rather nice onscreen visualisation. The in-game audio also deserves a mention, as the crowds chant team-specific names and the commentary is provided by Martin Tyler and Andy Gray. The commentary sounds low-quality in terms of bit rate, but the pundits provide plenty of natural-sounding banter. There are also 110 extra kits, balls, stadiums, and teams that you can buy in the EA store with points earned by playing through the different modes in the game.

FIFA 08 does pretty much everything that you could ask of a PSP football game. It boasts mountains of varied features, takes advantage of the console's hardware features, and is a fun game to play, too. Sure, there are modes from the other versions of FIFA 08 that could be added--notably, be a pro--but that's compensated for by plenty of PSP-specific offerings. The gameplay and AI could definitely be tightened up, but otherwise, this is a good portable version of a solid football game.

Arsenal 123's Rating - 85%

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Re: PS3 and PSP

I did honestly m8 the only bit that isn't mine is the first paragraph because i am bad at getting stuff like this started. ;)

I have only purchased Assassins Creed recently 5 days ago to be exact but i have found that the visuals are amazing and for me that is the best bit in the game.

Is that why it's the same review as this website:

http://uk.gamespot.com/ps3/action/assassinscreed/review.html?sid=6182795 - Same Assassins Creed Review

http://uk.gamespot.com/psp/action/thesimpsons/player_review.html?id=517336 - Same Simpsons PSP Review

http://reviews.cnet.com/psp-games/fifa-soccer-08-psp/4514-10078_7-32371679.html - Same FIFA 08 PSP Review.

Taking credit for other peoples work? ;):rolleyes:

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Re: PS3 and PSP

Dunno where to post so i thought id post it on here.

Can i have everyones PS3 online name ??

Just got one. and hooking it up to the internet as we speak. (taking ages to do this update though)

So may i have peoples Gamertag thingys??

I currently have :

PES2008

PES2009 (getting that later)

Tiger Woods 08

And then some others later.

Will tell you my Online name when i can pick it :o

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Re: PS3 and PSP

Dunno where to post so i thought id post it on here.

Can i have everyones PS3 online name ??

Just got one. and hooking it up to the internet as we speak. (taking ages to do this update though)

So may i have peoples Gamertag thingys??

I currently have :

PES2008

PES2009 (getting that later)

Tiger Woods 08

And then some others later.

Will tell you my Online name when i can pick it :o

Got one today

Mine is ADAMSKI93 (make sure adamski is all in capitals)

Up for playing FIFA09 and COD5

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