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Firefox Speed Tweak


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Here's a great tip I found....I thought I'd share it. :)

Here's something for broadband people that will really speed Firefox up:

1.Type "about :config" into the address bar and hit return. Scroll down and look for the following entries:

network.http.pipelining network.http.proxy.pipelining network.http.pipelining.maxrequests

Normally the browser will make one request to a web page at a time. When you enable pipelining it will make several at once,

which really speeds up page loading.

2. Alter the entries as follows:

Set "network.http.pipelining" to "true"

Set "network.http.proxy.pipelining" to "true"

Set "network.http.pipelining.maxrequests" to some number like 30. This means it will make 30 requests at once.

3. Lastly right-click anywhere and select New-> Integer. Name it "nglayout.initialpaint.delay" and set its value to "0". This

value is the amount of time the browser waits before it acts on information it recieves.

If you're using a broadband connection you'll load pages MUCH faster now!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Re: Firefox Speed Tweak

Just a small tip for any Firefox users who are using (or planning to use) this feature - personally I very rarely use Firefox, but that's just my own preference (Opera's features suit my needs better, that's all).

It does work, but it's not as simple as the quoted guide suggests.

2. Alter the entries as follows:

Set "network.http.pipelining" to "true"

Set "network.http.proxy.pipelining" to "true"

Set "network.http.pipelining.maxrequests" to some number like 30. This means it will make 30 requests at once.

The first problem is this bit.

Firefox is only able to make a maximum of 8 simultaneous requests. That's just the way the browser is designed. You can ask it to make 30... or even 100' date=' but it won't. 8 is the maximum.

Also, the higher you set this number, the more likely you are to make your browser crash, so again use 8 as a maximum.

Theoretically, even if 30+ requests was possible, you still wouldn't want to set it that high, because you'd probably end up having websites blocking access to your IP for hogging all the bandwidth and slowing down the servers (which could potentially be a big problem if everyone used this trick).

Actually, I personally wouldn't set this above 4. Most websites block more than a couple of requests from the same IP anyway, so all you're doing by sending more is clogging up your own broadband connection.

3. Lastly right-click anywhere and select New-> Integer. Name it "nglayout.initialpaint.delay" and set its value to "0". This

value is the amount of time the browser waits before it acts on information it recieves.

Second problem - this bit is totally pointless.

All this does is start displaying the information on the webpage sooner. Setting it to 0 does not make your page load faster. Things like blocks of text might appear instantly, but the overall time to load EVERYTHING on the page is the SAME (or actually longer on slower connections).

Ignore nglayout.initialpaint.delay. It's only a matter of preference, which doesn't affect overall speed.

Summary:

1. Give pipelining a try if you think your internet is a bit slow, but don't listen to the nonsense about massive numbers of requests or nglayout.initialpaint.delay.

2. If you're happy with your speed anyway, it's probably best to leave things alone. You won't get the hassle of anything messing up if you accidentally change anything you shouldn't in the process.

Pipelining was more useful 5 years ago when connections were slower. Most people shouldn't need it these days, but good luck if you decide to give it a try. :)

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