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Re: Safir's blog

Whats your reading speed now?

I went to:http://www.readingsoft.com/

and tried the test and comprehension...

decent score-394 with 80% comprehension..so I am trying your speed reading guide...

Just done this test. Got a speed of 312 WPM and a comprehension of 100%. May have to try some of the techniques you mentioned as that is pretty average :P

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Re: Safir's blog

Just done this test. Got a speed of 312 WPM and a comprehension of 100%. May have to try some of the techniques you mentioned as that is pretty average :P

Well, if you've never done speed reading, that's a fairly respectable starting point. :)

Just as a quick check:

Do you reread?

Do you vocalize words in your mind?

Those are probably the two most common reasons for slower speed. Eliminate them and you should see at least a 100% increase in your reading speed.

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Re: Safir's blog

Alright, I'm reviving this ancient thread but it will be used for very different purposes.

I don't think many people are subscribed to this thread anymore and not many will see these posts. But perhaps that's for the better. :D

In due time I hope to roll out a few posts that will be really useful for life, albeit controversial to varying degrees.

--

I'm gonna start off with something quite light and simple:

Do you know what I just realized these forums could be really good at?

If you need advice on things that you're reluctant to bring out in real life (non crime related things though, because those can be tracked by authorities :D) -- I'm talking about new, perhaps somewhat controversial theories and ideas you have about life or something else.

You can turn to your pals in the forums. People, who know you in a very different setting but with whom you've developed a certain type of a relationship, one that is much deeper than the one you'd have with some random guy in a random advice forum.

Thoughts?

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Re: Safir's blog

Alright' date=' I'm reviving this ancient thread but it will be used for very different purposes.

I don't think many people are subscribed to this thread anymore and not many will see these posts. But perhaps that's for the better. :D [/quote']

I am! :D I remember doing that speed reading test, but that was months ago :eek:

In due time I hope to roll out a few posts that will be really useful for life' date=' albeit controversial to varying degrees.

--

I'm gonna start off with something quite light and simple:

Do you know what I just realized these forums could be really good at?

If you need advice on things that you're reluctant to bring out in real life (non crime related things though, because those can be tracked by authorities :D) -- I'm talking about new, perhaps somewhat controversial theories and ideas you have about life or something else.

You can turn to your pals in the forums. People, who know you in a very different setting but with whom you've developed a certain type of a relationship, one that is much deeper than the one you'd have with some random guy in a random advice forum.

Thoughts?[/quote']

Sounds like a good idea. Although there is a point I'd like to bring up:

1:

The most enjoyable way to play is with your friends.

So thus, a lot of people will have friends in real life that are also on the forum. A small problem could arise when someone posts something, and a forumer who also knows them in real life saw said post. For example, me and KlHepworth have known each other for years, so I might not want to post something in fear of him seeing it (Although I could always beat him up if he mentioned it ;)) This of course would be if someone posted something personal, not like a theory or something :)

But I do think it would work, it would be quite nice for this forum to have a place where we can help each other out. Maybe you could even make a new thread for advice, where we can all help each other out? :)

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Re: Safir's blog

I am! :D I remember doing that speed reading test' date=' but that was months ago :eek:[/quote']

Haha, ancient thread huh? :D

So thus, a lot of people will have friends in real life that are also on the forum.

But I do think it would work, it would be quite nice for this forum to have a place where we can help each other out. Maybe you could even make a new thread for advice, where we can all help each other out? :)

Good point about the connection to real life. I'm quite sure most people know each other through Facebook, etc as well.

http://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/

I guess we can incorporate into Misc something in the form of "ask a soccer enthusiast" :D

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Re: Safir's blog

In due time I hope to roll out a few posts that will be really useful for life' date=' albeit controversial to varying degrees.

Do you know what I just realized these forums could be really good at?

If you need advice on things that you're reluctant to bring out in real life (non crime related things though, because those can be tracked by authorities :D) -- I'm talking about new, perhaps somewhat controversial theories and ideas you have about life or something else.

You can turn to your pals in the forums. People, who know you in a very different setting but with whom you've developed a certain type of a relationship, one that is much deeper than the one you'd have with some random guy in a random advice forum.

Thoughts?[/quote']

So do we get to call you Sufferin Safir?:P(jking)

I am! :D I remember doing that speed reading test' date=' but that was months ago :eek:

[/quote']

Yeah that was decent..:) I think I got about 20 wpm..:o

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Re: Safir's blog

Saf are you planning on resuscitating this?

Sometimes to move forward you need to deconstruct-take whats good, get rid of the rest (habits, things, hang ups, even people at times) and keep going.

Otherwise the sacrifice you make now will become a burden, and the further away from your starting point it's easier to drop out as it becomes heavier.

With a sacrifice you keep looking forward unencumbered with distractions as you stride forward towards your goal.

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Re: Safir's blog

Saf are you planning on resuscitating this?

Sometimes to move forward you need to deconstruct-take whats good' date=' get rid of the rest (habits, things, hang ups, even people at times) and keep going.

Otherwise the sacrifice you make now will become a burden, and the further away from your starting point it's easier to drop out as it becomes heavier.

With a sacrifice you keep looking forward unencumbered with distractions as you stride forward towards your goal.[/quote']

At some point I'll come back to this.

I am currently in the process of doing exactly what you said :)

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Re: Safir's blog

Visual vs. textual intake balance

Never ignore joy - combine it with forum

---------------------------------------------------------

Other

Bring joy from this instead of rs

Comparative advantage of hyper turbos for eoc.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Careful with data...

One of the best-known real-life examples of Simpson's paradox occurred when the University of California, Berkeley was sued for bias against women who had applied for admission to graduate schools there. The admission figures for the fall of 1973 showed that men applying were more likely than women to be admitted, and the difference was so large that it was unlikely to be due to chance.[3][14]

Examination of aggregate data on graduate admissions to the University of California, Berkeley, for fall 1973 shows a clear but misleading pattern of bias against female applicants. Examination of the disaggregated data reveals few decision-making units that show statistically significant departures from expected frequencies of female admissions, and about as many units appear to favor women as to favor men. If the data are properly pooled, taking into account the autonomy of departmental decision making, thus correcting for the tendency of women to apply to graduate departments that are more difficult for applicants of either sex to enter, there is a small but statistically significant bias in favor of women. The graduate departments that are easier to enter tend to be those that require more mathematics in the undergraduate preparatory curriculum. The bias in the aggregated data stems not from any pattern of discrimination on the part of admissions committees, which seem quite fair on the whole, but apparently from prior screening at earlier levels of the educational system. Women are shunted by their socialization and education toward fields of graduate study that are generally more crowded, less productive of completed degrees, and less well funded, and that frequently offer poorer professional employment prospects.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/187/4175/398.abstract

The research paper by Bickel et al.[14] concluded that women tended to apply to competitive departments with low rates of admission even among qualified applicants (such as in the English Department), whereas men tended to apply to less-competitive departments with high rates of admission among the qualified applicants (such as in engineering and chemistry).

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Re: Safir's blog

Some thoughts on the relative growth potential of a few fields.

I'd like to do something in technology – because it's growing, or in politics – because that's within my circle of competence.

I feel social networks will become less important, because people will get sick of the over-intrusion and lack of privacy. For many a central part of life is to be able to lead double lives and excessive social technology is taking away people's ability to wear different masks depending on the situation (see The Importance of Being Earnest).

Data, security in IT are important, but mostly for big companies and governments. To become legitimate in that field, you need to be “trusted”. Might as well do finance then or flip houses...

Digital entertainment has by far the greatest possibilities for growth. If someone wants to get rich quick (and have the right talents and skills ready, clearly), I'd suggest they come up with a cheap-to-create, highly entertaining TV show or a movie. There are plenty of film buffs and competent actresses and actors around who would relish the chance of any work, as long as the script and the leadership is good.

Consumerism is still pretty strong. I still like entertainment's upside the best though.

Personally I'd keep medical fields on the backburner – keep an eye on them but don't get involved – because there's already a lot of talent there. The marginal value that I can create is limited.

In medicine, reconstructing limbs or organs probably holds the highest upside.

I could come up with a definitive tool that makes it easier to collaborate politically to push forward policies (that people already want to endorse). While it's really hard to get people to unite for an issue, crowdsourcing it makes it far more likely that someone succeeds. I'd be fine with it since this way, we'd move more towards democracy and less towards elite interest groups pushing away everyone else. But I'd be assassinated pretty quickly in that case.

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Re: Safir's blog

So, what is the best way to deal with any or all of these insults?

1. Anger. This is the weakest possible response, and this for three main reasons. First, it shows that we take the insult, and therefore the insulter, seriously. Second, it suggests that there is truth in the insult. And third, it destabilizes us and causes us pain.

2. Acceptance. This may seem like a very weak response, but in many cases it is actually the strongest response of all. When someone insults us, we ought to consider three things: whether the insult is true, who it came from, and why. If the insult is true, the person it came from is reasonable, and his motive is worthy, then the insult is not an insult but a statement of fact and, moreover, one that is potentially very helpful to us. Thus it is usually the case that we do not or ought not take offense at our teacher, parent, or best friend.

In general, if I respect the person who insulted me, I ought to give thought to the insult and learn as much as I can from it. On the other hand, if I think that the person who insulted me is not worthy of my consideration, I have no reason to take offense at him, just as I have no reason to take offense at a naughty child or a barking dog.

Notice that, whatever the case, I have no reason to take offense.

3. Returning the insult. There are several problems with the put-down, even if it is a very clever one. First, it does have to be clever, and, second, it has to occur to us at just the right moment. But even if we are as sharp and witty as Oscar Wilde, a clever put-down is unlikely to constitute our best defence. You see, the problem with the clever put-down is that, however clever it is, it tends to equalize us with our insulter, raising him up to our level and bringing us down to his. This gives him, and therefore his insult, far too much credibility. In fact, the clever put-down should only be used amongst friends, and only to add to the merriment of the occasion. And it should end with something like a toast or a rub on the shoulder. In short, it should only be used for the purpose of humor.

4. Humor. Humor is an especially effective response for three reasons: it undermines the insult, it brings the audience (if any) on side, and it diffuses the tension of the situation. Here is an example of the effective use of humor. Cato the Younger, the Roman statesman and stoic philosopher, was pleading a case when his adversary Lentulus spat in his face. After wiping off the spittle, Cato said, “I will swear to anyone, Lentulus, that people are wrong to say that you cannot use your mouth.”

Sometimes, it might even be appropriate to exaggerate or add to the insult so as to make a mockery of the insulter and, by extension, of the insult. "Ah, if only you had known me better, you would have found greater fault still!"

5. Ignoring the insult. One downside of humor is that it requires quick thinking. In contrast, ignoring the insult is easier and, in fact, more powerful. One day, a boor struck Cato whilst he was out at the public baths. When the boor realized that it was Cato whom he had struck, he came to offer his apology. Instead of getting angry or accepting the apology, Cato replied, “I don’t remember being struck.”

Subtext of his reply: “You are so insignificant that I don’t even care to register your apology, let alone to take offense at your insult.”

In conclusion, we need never take offense at an insult. Offense exists not in the insult but in our reaction to it, and our reactions are completely within our control. It is unreasonable to expect a boor to be anything but a boor; if we take offense at his bad behaviour, we have only ourselves to blame.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/hide-and-seek/201302/how-deal-insults-and-put-downs

Offense

Pros: In situations where you can't lose social status (e.g. work), may better strike back.

Cons: More resource-consuming, create enemies, some allies may perceive this as a negative quality in you.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

http://ideas.time.com/2013/03/08/why-insults-hurt-and-why-they-shouldnt/

I became interested in the social function of insults while doing research on the Stoic philosophers, who spent a lot of time thinking about how best to deal with them. I thought this was an odd thing for philosophers to do, but ultimately realized that they were on to something. After all, one role of philosophy is to teach us how to have a good life, and insults—whether blatant, benign, or even backhanded—have the power to make us miserable.

What I realized was that the pain caused by insults is really just a symptom of a far more serious ailment: our participation in the social hierarchy game. We are people who need to be among people. The problem is that once we are among them, we feel compelled to sort ourselves into social hierarchies. If we were wolves, we’d fight to establish the social order of the pack. But since we are humans with outsized brains and language, we use words instead.

It is the social hierarchy game that makes insults sting. We are wired so that it feels bad to lose social status and feels good to gain it. That’s why a teasing jibe from a good friend isn’t painful—we haven’t lost status from it—but an unanswered email from our boss or a dilatory response to an invitation can diminish our sense of self-worth.

Those playing the social hierarchy game try to score points by insulting others, who respond with counter-insults. Game-players also spend their days saying, doing, and even buying things calculated to gain the admiration of other people. Such attempts are likely to fail, though, since people rarely want only to admire, preferring instead to be admired. It is a recipe for social strife and personal misery.

The solution to this predicament is simple: withdraw from the social hierarchy game. In practical terms, this means becoming an insult pacifist: when insulted, you carry on as if nothing happened. Or if you do respond to an insult, you use self‑deprecating humor: you insult yourself even worse than they did and laugh while doing it.

You might worry that practicing insult pacifism would invite a barrage of more verbal abuse. I have been an insult pacifist for several years now and have found just the opposite. When you respond to people’s insults not with counter‑insults but with humor, you make them look foolish: they hit you with their best verbal shot, and you only laughed in response. As a result, they are less likely to insult you again. I have also discovered that by responding to insults with self‑deprecating humor, you take much of the sting out of them. This is because it is psychologically difficult to get upset over something you are making a joke about.

Withdrawing from the social hierarchy game, I should add, can also beneficially transform our relationships. Instead of spending conversations trying to convince people how wonderful we are, we will start listening, really listening, to what they tell us. They will likely take notice.

Defense

Pros: Easy to do, easy to maintain.

Cons: If social status in that setting matters, can be misperceived as weakness. Holds more true in low-education and low-maturity settings.

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Re: Safir's blog

A: All influence is immoral--immoral from the scientific point

of view."

B: "Why?"

A: "Because to influence a person is to give him one's own soul.

He does not think his natural thoughts, or burn with his natural passions.

His virtues are not real to him.

............

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